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Sunday November 23rd 2014

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Posts Tagged ‘Lot’

3 Effective Ways To Build Your Business Using Linkedin

Linkedin

LinkedIn can be used for more than just finding a new company or career building. Marketers can use the site as a prime way to build business by making connections with influential individuals in their specific industry. LinkedIn company pages are proving to be an excellent way to advertise at no cost. Here are three tips that will help benefit your LinkedIn company page and help grow your business without spending a penny.

1.) Create Leadership: One of the most effective ways to build your business on LinkedIn is to position yourself as an expert in your field. LinkedIn Answers  and Groups allow you to gain leverage in your specific industry. You can do this by sharing relevant and informative information from your website or blog. People join groups and ask questions to gain valuable information from someone who may appear more knowledgeable in a certain field of interest. Having answers to hard questions will build your professional reputation and help establish yourself as the go-to guru.. This type of marketing is subtle but will help promote your business to new audiences.

2.) Update Your Status: This is crucial. The more you update your status, the better opportunity you create to generate more clients. Use your status  to notify your connections of promotions you may be offering, business announcements, or new products you have to offer. This will help build your brand while creating trust with your connections. Do this without flagrant self-promotion.  

3.) Display Your Brand: When people go to any social media site you operate, your brand should be prevalent. Add a picture or logo that represents your company. Be sure your site is constructed professionally and has your contact information prominently displayed. People do not want to spend a lot of time trying to figure out  who you are and what you have to offer, your brand should speak loudly.

 

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HereDeixis – In linguistics, deixis refers to the phenomenon wherein understanding the meaning of certain words and phrases in an utterance requires contextual information.

Twitter For Business: What And Where To Share

Photo by C!../Flickr

 

Sharing is a big part of a successful social-media campaign. You’ve got to share and be shared to gather followers, fans, and friends online. But, for a lot of people, curiosity about social media is overwhelmed by a sense of dread over having to come up with content, posts, updates, and tweets on a regular basis.

Here are some ways to ideas, hints, and tips on what and where to share …

You’re A Curator: First things first, you don’t have to have anything interesting to say. The Internet is a vast resource and no one person can absorb all the information that’s available online. Which is to say, if you’ve come across anything in the news or anything that would be of interest to a potential client, share a link on your Twitter page. It’s a great way of informing and keeping in touch with existing customers and potential business. And it relieves you of the necessity of always having to come up with something to say off the top of your head. A curator is in charge of choosing the art that hangs on a museum’s walls, not creating it. Think of yourself as a curator and share the most interesting and relevant news that relates to your target audience.

You’re An Expert: Now, you may not think of yourself as an expert. Few people do. However, if you’ve spent any time in your current business, chances are you know more than the people paying you for your services. Otherwise, they’d do it themselves. That means, at the very least, you can add insights, context, and explanation to any information you’ve tweeted. If, for example, you tweet a link to an article related to your industry, add another tweet with some background or explanation. Give your Twitter followers some of your insight and expertise and they just may end up as your customers and clients

You’re A Media Mogul: Most importantly, share your content between your social-media sites. If you’re setting up a Twitter page, there are many ways to import blog posts and such to your Twitter feed. There are also easy-to-use apps and tools that will export your tweets to your Facebook page, LinkedIn profile, or blog. In other words, think of each of your individual pages as part of one whole. Spread your content around and make sure it’s getting out and circulating among all your connections and contacts across the Internet. The more you share, the more visible you are. The more visible you are, the more likely you are to turn online contacts into real-world clients.

Three Keys To Building A Business Brand Online

There aren’t a lot of self-described idiots out there. Which is to say, people like to believe they’re smart. And that’s the reason branding your business online is so important. After all, your customers and clients want to feel like they’re making an informed decision before spending their money. So the more information you share, the more they feel like they’re making a smart choice by choosing to do business with you.

Here are some tips to building a better business brand through social media …

The Foundation: In order to properly brand your business, you’ll need a foundation. That means, having a business blog. Having a blog provides your social network with a focal point. It also offers a convenient way to share content that can then be posted on any additional social-media sites you’ve set up. Make sure, though, that your blog represents your business professionally and consistently. Pay attention to the theme, layout, and widgets you’re using. Though it’s tempting to use all the bells and whistles available to you, a cluttered blog means a cluttered brand. Make sure it’s easy to read and, most importantly, easy to identify who’s in charge. You’ll want visitors to read what you’ve posted on your blog but you’ll also want them to know who you are and what you do.

The Goal: It’s easy enough to get yourself a blog and/or a Facebook page, Twitter account, or LinkedIn profile but you’ll also need a goal. The idea behind social-media marketing is to brand yourself as an expert and a resource. You want people to do business with you and you’re online to give them better access to you, your knowledge, and your business. In other words, your goal is to offer valuable information about your services, industry, and business and to share it with potential clients and customers. If you’re seen as knowledgeable, experienced, and willing to spend the time to make sure your clients are informed, you’ll increase the visibility and reputation of your business.

The Benefits: A properly branded social-media campaign can provide many benefits to your business. Most of all, it increases customer loyalty and referrals as it creates a stronger bond between you and your clients. If you’re communicating with your customers, sharing content, and responding to comments and questions online, you’re boosting the likelihood that those customers will remember you next time they’re in the market for your services or know someone that is. Social media also offers a platform for you to research your region and industry to help you better your business. Most of all, though, it serves as a word-of-mouth generator. The more you participate, the better the success rate.

The Ibis Network / www.theibisnetwork.com

Three Things To Know Before Starting A Social-Media Campaign

 

The biggest mistake most businesses make when beginning a social-media campaign is believing they know how to begin a social-media campaign. Knowing nothing more than it’s easy and takes no more than 10 minutes to get started may get your page up and your phone number in the right spot, but then what?

Unfortunately, like anything else, to be successful requires a little advance planning, research, and know how. No, you don’t need a degree in computer science. But it helps to familiarize yourself with the terminology, the concept, and what has worked for others.

Here’s a quick three-step guide to what it is, what works, and what it takes to succeed …

Know What: You’ve heard that Facebook is hugely popular, so that’s a good place to start, right? Well do you want to set up a page or a profile? There’s a difference and knowing it is the difference between building your business and building a collection of your most embarrassing photos. Know the terms, the capabilities, and the purpose of each. Take a look at the definition of a blog and how that’s different from micro-blogging or what an RSS feed is and how it can help fill out your social-media profiles. You don’t need to become an expert but familiarizing yourself a bit more with what things are and how they’re used can help you build a plan that fits with your plan and works for your business.

Know Why: Which brings us to the next step … Building success online means keeping up communications and giving people a reason to visit your pages. Having a lot of empty space on the Internet won’t build your business. One of the biggest misconceptions people have about social media is that having your links spread across the web is the ultimate goal and you’re done once you’ve got your pages set up. A Twitter page isn’t an advertisement and, if it were, it wouldn’t be a good one without the tweets. Don’t bother setting up the pages if you aren’t going to use them. Or start with something you can handle, or that fits your business, and build from there. Start smart and small.

Know How: The key to social-media marketing success is understanding that it isn’t advertising. Think of it as a magazine that you’re publishing. You wouldn’t attract any readers if your magazine had no articles and, instead, was only advertisements for the same business, page after page. In other words, you have to produce content that people will want enough to return to your page for updates. The content is bait. You have to have something to offer before you can expect your social-media campaign to show measurable benefits. Empty profiles and links to your other web pages won’t bring you business. Having an interactive, informative, and entertaining presence online will.

The Ibis Network / www.theibisnetwork.com

Writing For Readers: How To Craft Blog Content That Attracts A Crowd

Unless your business is writing, keeping a business blog doesn’t mean you have to be a wordsmith. It doesn’t require that you have a flair for sentence structure, a stockpile of four-syllable words, or unparalleled wit and wisdom either.

In fact, successful online content is less about your way with the written word and more about offering easy-to-read, useful and unique posts that can be digested quickly. After all, people visiting your site have the entire Internet to search through. They aren’t likely to want to wade through a 10,000 word thesis. You have to catch their attention quickly. That means writing in a conversational tone and less like you’re trying to get an “A” on your 8th grade English paper.

Here are some tips to creating successful blog content …

Keep it Short: The Internet has trained us to move quickly as we search and scan for the information we’re looking for. In other words, visitors to your Facebook page or blog aren’t going to give you a lot of their time. Keep your paragraphs short and your posts concise. If you have a lot of information, break it up in a list or over a series of posts. In general, the easier it is for your readers to quickly understand your point, the more readers you’ll have.

Keep it Simple: Think of the last thing you enjoyed reading online. Was it because it was challenging and sent you running to the dictionary to look up words every other paragraph? Or was it because it was incredibly involved, filled with technical jargon, and kept you glued to your screen for the better part of a Tuesday afternoon? Probably not. Conversational tone means writing as though you were talking to someone. Chances are you have an easier time expressing yourself in conversation than you do when you sit down to write. Get the idea down, leave it alone, then read it again in an hour. Fill in the gaps and take out anything unnecessary. Now post.

Keep it Interesting: Thing is, no matter how well you craft your blog posts, a screen full of text is going to turn-off a lot of visitors to your site. Sure, you have to give them something to read but it helps if you include some visuals as well. Adding photos, diagrams, charts, and video to your posts will make your site more visually interesting and increase the chances that someone lingers long enough to get interested in what you’ve written.

The Ibis Network / www.theibisnetwork.com