The Ibis Network's Social-Media Marketing Tips
Tuesday July 22nd 2014

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Posts Tagged ‘Many People’

By The Numbers: Four Stats That May Change Your Mind About Social Media

If you were told that you could network your business to millions of people without spending anything more than your time and effort, you’d have to be crazy or independently wealthy to turn down the opportunity. And yet, many people ignore the platform social media provides to spread the word and promote their business. If you’re among those that still feel that social media isn’t important, necessary, or vital to boosting your business, a recent Harris Interactive poll of 2,037 may help change your mind.

Here are some of the numbers …

62 percent of Americans say they’re afraid of missing something if they don’t keep an eye on their social network. In other words, a majority of respondents are glued to status, news, and event updates received through their Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn accounts. Which means, social-media is as important a source of information to a majority of Americans as their phone and email messages. Having a presence on any – or all – of the major social-media sites is an opportunity to be among the updates being shared and read by the millions of Americans that check in on Facebook before reading their email inbox.

Among respondents 18 to 34, nearly 40 percent said they check their profiles every morning after waking up. Maybe you’re thinking that your business doesn’t appeal to a young demographic and that means you don’t need a social-media campaign. But the fact that an increasing number of young Americans turn to social media immediately after getting out of bed says something about the future importance of the medium and the probably longevity of its popularity. In other words, social media isn’t going away. In fact, it’s becoming more popular among Americans.

40 percent said they’d rather clean the shower drains at the local gym than give up their social network. Okay, maybe the drains at your local gym are spotless and that stat doesn’t impress you. How about the fact that the same number of respondents said they’d rather wait in line at the DMV, give up an hour of sleep every night for a year, get a root canal, or sit in traffic for four hours while listening to polka music?

Nearly 70 percent of LinkedIn users are just observing. Not all social-media users are interested in telling the world what they did with their day. In fact, a lot of activity on social networks doesn’t involve posting or participating. The fact that more than half of Twitter users and nearly 40 percent of people on Facebook are just looking means your information, content, and updates could be among those being read by users who log in to their social-media accounts as a source for information, recommendations, and news.

The Basics: 3 Social Media Mistakes To Avoid

If you spent all of your time with your head in a bucket, you’d never see the sunshine. Fortunately, there are some fairly obvious ways to correct that issue. Among them, the first – and most obvious – is taking the bucket off of your head. When it comes to social media, there are those that understand, participate, and benefit from the available online tools and there are others that seem to have placed their head in the aforementioned bucket. But, in much the same way, there are some easy solutions for anyone who remains on the social-media sidelines.

Here are three basic social-media mistakes and misconceptions to avoid …

The Only Thing You Have To Fear: Fear is responsible for a lot of missed opportunities. So remember that when you’re telling yourself that your business doesn’t need social media to succeed. Maybe you’re right but maybe you’d be twice as successful if you made an effort to market your wares online. In other words, the number one mistake people make is not trying. Social media can be intimidating for the uninitiated but, trust us, it’s pretty user friendly and the risks are low. Try starting with one account and go from there. You don’t have to master the Internet in the first week. You can, however, get a profile up and start getting the word out. Take small steps. If you get stuck, you’re only a Google search away from an answer to your problem.

Use It or Lose it: Once you’re online and have your info up on the social-media site of your choice, keep logging in. This isn’t a one-stop fix. Abandoning your social-media pages sends the wrong signal to prospective clients and also defeats the purpose of having a page in the first place. Log in often and familiarize yourself with the functions and possibilities. There are limitless ways you can use social media to your advantage but none of them will work if you never log in. It sounds obvious but many people throw in the towel soon after adding their address. Then they proclaim that Facebook and LinkedIn are useless. Those people are wrong. If you spend some time tinkering around, you’ll undoubtedly find ways to boost your presence and build new relationships with potential clients and customers.

Be Resourceful: There are hundreds of available applications, tools, and plugins available for any social-media platform you choose to use. Take some time to research them and figure out what they do. They are there to make your job easier. Technology, though scary to some, is ultimately there to make you more efficient and your work easier. If, however, you never explore its potential, you will never reap the benefits. No matter what you’re attempting to do, there’s likely an application designed to help you out. And most are totally free to use. That means, there’s absolutely nothing to lose other than time. And, after a couple of searches, you will, no doubt, locate a number of resources that will not only make your social-media experience more enjoyable but more profitable as well.

The Business of Blogging: Why You Need A Blog And How To Get Started

The Internet doesn’t stand still. It’s constantly evolving and ever changing. And for that reason alone you need a business blog. Unlike your business website, a blog can – and should – be updated regularly. So, while your website may have all the most pertinent and relevant information about you and your business, it’s the same info anytime anyone visits. A blog gives you the ability to provide potential clients and customers with fresh content and a reason to return to your site in the future. It also gives you a platform to further impress, explain, and inform, in addition to driving page views and traffic to your website.

Here are the basics …

The What: A blog isn’t a replacement for your business website. It is a supplement to your other online destinations. Which means, you’ll benefit most if your blog and website are linked and driving traffic to one another. Promote your blog on your site and your website on your blog. The same goes for any other social-media sites you’ve set up. Creating a network of online properties that are professional, well maintained, and regularly updated gives potential customers the ability to investigate you and your business and become more comfortable with your expertise, experience, and services. It’ll also provide increased customer interaction and loyalty, as well as helping your business appear higher in search-engine results. And, let’s face it, not many people are using the phone book anymore. People search online when looking for goods and services. It’s best that you’re there when they get there.

The How: It’s always easier said than done. It’s one thing to say you’d like to start a business blog and another altogether to actually maintain and update one on a somewhat regular basis. And the number one reason for that is the writing. You’ll have to have some content to share. And you’ll have to have a fair amount too. The good news is content is easier to generate if you think in terms of types and not topics. In other words, come up with a few types of posts that seem easier to craft and then alter the topics each time. Lists, for example, are an always popular choice for blog posts. Others include, how-to posts, insider info and expert opinions, predictions, polls, and surveys. Eventually, you’ll develop a rhythm and schedule that works for you. Don’t give up too quickly.

The When: One would assume, if you’re in business, you’re in business to make money. So you’re likely thinking, “When will I see actual business after writing all these lists, posts, and updates?” Well, your blog is not a sales tool. It’s a marketing vehicle for your brand and an opportunity to attract a new audience for your services. In other words, think of it as added value. It sets you apart from your competition by offering extra information and expertise that benefits your customer. It makes you more accessible online and more easily found. In short, it provides a lot of value to your business and your clients while building your brand, online presence, and reputation. But it may take time and it’s success all depends on your goals and expectations. If you expect to put up a blog and be ringing up sales after your first post, you’ll likely be disappointed. Give it time. The more content you share on your blog, the higher you’ll rank in search-engine results. It adds up. And again, when’s the last time you used a phone book?

The Ibis Network / www.theibisnetwork.com